If I report something with details, will the University launch an investigation, formal complaint or tell the police? 

No. 
Letting us know what happened via the Report and Support tool does not trigger any type of formal reporting process. The only reason that the University would ever take any action that is outside of your full control is: 
  • If your life or the lives of others is at risk. Examples of this would be if a report states that someone has plans to complete suicide, has plans to self-harm to an extent that endangers their life or if a report contains threats to other people's lives. 
  • If the reporter is under 18. 
Submitting a report with details is a means of accessing your own personal advisor, and bespoke support. It is not a tool for triggering formal complaints procedures. 

If I report something as a member of staff, will HR be informed? 

No. 
Letting us know what happened via the Report and Support tool does not trigger any type of formal reporting process. The only reason that the University would ever take any action that is outside of your full control is: 
  • If your life or the lives of others is at risk. Examples of this would be if a report states that someone has plans to complete suicide, has plans to self-harm to an extent that endangers their life or if a report contains threats to other people's lives. 
  • If the reporter is under 18. 
Submitting a report with details means that a Dignity Contact will be in touch to ensure that you fully understand both your reporting and support options, as well as talking through the situation if you wish. It is not a tool for triggering formal complaints procedures. 

How much information do I need to submit in my report?

This is entirely up to you. However there are a few key things to consider: 
  • If you are submitting an anonymous report- then detail is key, Particularly if you have requested for action to be taken if possible. Due to the limiting nature of anonymous reports, and our inability to contact the reporting party, it is vital that anonymous reports contain as much detail as possible to help support a potential investigation. 
  • If you are submitting a report with details then you do not need to submit as much detail, and you can in fact let us know that reliving your experience through the text-box is too much for you. As long as we know what type of harassment you are reporting, and you have provided the correct contact details, then the most relevant advisor can get in touch. 

What questions will the Report and Support form ask me? 

You can see the questions in advance here.

Who will be told about the report and is it confidential?

Confidentiality is key to the Report and Support service.

Our Privacy Policy makes it clear that unless there are circumstances where there is a need to share information to ensure safety or to fulfil the university’s duty of care under safeguarding, no other parties will be informed about your disclosure.

Not your department, not your colleagues, not the student discipline team, not HR, not the police, not your parents, guardians or friends and certainly not the alleged perpetrator. Both the online form and the conversations you have with your assigned Liaison Officer are confidential.

What can my assigned Student Liaison Officer support me with? 

If you report with details, a Student Liaison Officer will be in contact within 2 University Working Days. A Student Liaison Officer can: 
  • Outline both your reporting and support options, in order to help empower you to make an informed decision on your next steps. A Student Liaison Officer will not force you to report anything, and your conversations remain confidential. 
  • Fully outline both the informal and formal resolution processes- letting you know about anticipated timelines and potential outcomes. 
  • Remain your single point of contact if you wish, between yourself and University staff. This is to help minimise repetition of disclosure. 
  • Act as your supporting party in investigation interviews, disciplinary committees, mitigation committees and appeals if you wish.
  • Help you to prepare supporting statements and the collection of evidence.  
  • Help to arrange mediation or informal resolutions. 
  • Arrange and accompany you to meetings with University staff, such as personal tutors, Warwick Accommodation etc. 
  • Help support you in submitting evidence for Mitigating Circumstances or extensions. 
  • Signpost you to relevant support services, both internal and external depending on your needs. 
  • Support you with any housing, financial or society/sports club related concerns. 
  • Ensure that you are kept up to date with the progression of your potential case. 
  • Answer any questions, big or small about both your reporting and support options. 

Can a student submit a report about a member of staff? 

Yes. 

Can a staff member submit a report about a student, or other member of staff? 

Yes. 

I’ve heard the university doesn’t do anything about people who are reported. Is this true? 

No. 
Report and Support’s specially trained team of Liaison Officers are entirely reporter-led. Formal action can only be taken by the University of Warwick if the reporter chooses to submit a formal complaint and the case is found proven. 1:1 support by a Liaison Officer is available to reporters if they do choose to submit a formal complaint.

Contrary to popular belief, sanctions are put in place against those who are formally reported and found proven of misconduct. The number of sanctions imposed each year are publicly available in the Report and Support Annual Report, and include but aren’t limited to expulsion, temporary withdrawal, bans from campus and graduation all the way through to fines, depending on what misconduct the individual has been found proven of enacting.

Informal resolutions such as mediation and awareness training sessions for societies, sports clubs or departments are also available as a different form of resolution if the reporter prefers these options.

I'm afraid of not having enough evidence and maybe not being believed.

Your Liaison Officer will believe and support you, regardless of how much information you are willing to share. 

We appreciate that meeting a Liaison Officer for the first time could feel like a stressful experience, therefore we have written the online form to give reporters the opportunity to disclose any information that they would like to share before the initial meeting. Each reporter will feel differently about this. Some will want to provide lots of information, others will want to provide no information at all. Either way, your disclosure will be taken seriously.


I know someone who have made anonymous reports and nothing has happened, why is this?

Throughout the Anonymous disclosure form on the Report and Support platform, we try to make it clear that anonymous reports cannot lead to direct formal action being taken. 

Without a named reporting party, the alleged responding party may be unable to answer investigative questions if they do not know who the complaint is in relation to or who has reported them. It also limits investigations, as the investigating officer will only have one anonymous disclosure to base an entire investigation from and cannot gather potentially important further details from a reporter if they are required.

Nevertheless, indirect action can be taken on the back of anonymous reports. This can take the form of training sessions being delivered by the Report and Support team to particular sports clubs, societies and departments that are displaying behaviours that breach the university’s regulations.

If you would like direct formal action to be taken by the university, please submit a ‘Speak to an Advisor’ form, or else we are limited in our response.

Are anonymous reports, with no action taken, actually helpful in identifying trends?

Definitely. Anonymous reporting, even with no action taken, is incredibly useful for informing targeted proactive education and awareness raising. In just one year of Report and Support being available to students, we have managed to tailor many of our resources and training sessions to cover emerging trends in ways that we would not have been able to in the past. 

If I know a few people who would all like to report the same person, are they able to do this together? 

One person can submit a disclosure on behalf of a group of reporters and have a group confidential meeting with a Liaison Officer, if this would make everyone feel more comfortable.

However, the Liaison Officer will often arrange individual meetings with each reporting party following this group meeting. This is just to ensure that everyone feels like they are able to make their own independent choices and remain in control of their next steps.

Can students and staff only report things that happened on campus or at university events? 

No. 
Report and Support is available to all students, staff and visitors who have experienced sexual misconduct, discrimination, harassment, bullying and/ or hate crime.

The Report and Support Team understand that this could happen to students and staff beyond the university campus and even overseas. Support is available regardless of where the individual is based in the world or where it happened. The Liaison Officer will simply work to tailor the support and reporting options to the individual’s circumstances.

What if something has happened to someone in their personal life outside university or the perpetrator is a random member of the public?

It does not matter if the perpetrator is a member of the public, a partner or family member that has nothing to do with the University of Warwick. What matters is whether a disclosing student or staff member would benefit from the support of a specially trained Liaison Officer.

The Liaison Officer will simply work to tailor the support and reporting options to the individual’s circumstances.

Is it true that survivors of sexual or domestic violence reporting someone they are/were close to will be interpreted as them consenting to what happened to them?

No. 
Over 50% of all sexual violence is committed by acquaintances, and the team of specially trained Liaison Officers are fully aware of this. 

The university’s Sexual Misconduct Policy and the law makes it clear that consent cannot be assumed on the basis of a previous sexual experience or previously given consent, and consent may be withdrawn at any time. The status of someone’s relationship with someone therefore is not important when it comes to sexual misconduct. If consent is not ongoing and the individual does not have the freedom and capacity to consent - then it is sexual misconduct.

Some people won’t disclose experiences through Report and Support because they don’t think they’re ‘bad enough’, particularly things like racialised microaggressions, are their fears valid?

No. 
No incident needs to be physically violent in nature nor leave scars, marks or bruises on someone’s body to be classed as harassment. We understand that harassment can be subtle, can happen online and can sometimes even be invisible to the naked eye or ear. These understated actions would still constitute harassment and can be disclosed via Report and Support. 

If someone feels that their dignity has been violated, or that they would benefit from the support provided by a Liaison Officer to help them feel safer and more comfortable whilst at the University of Warwick, then we would encourage disclosing via the ‘Speak to an Advisor’ form.

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There are two ways you can tell us what happened